Where to withdraw cash from Tokyo ATM machines

It is now easier than ever to withdraw cash from an ATM cash machine in Tokyo using a foreign issued credit or debit card. It used to be so difficult to find an ATM in Tokyo which accepted foreign issued cards. But things are changing in Japan, and it now it is very easy to find an ATM Cash machine to withdraw Japanese Yen.

7 Eleven stores have always been the place to go to withdraw cash in Tokyo from ATM cash machines. 7 Eleven in Japan run their own ATM network under ‘7 Bank’. There are hundreds of 7 Eleven stores in Tokyo so anywhere you see a 7 Eleven store, you will find a 7 Bank ATM cash machine inside which accepts foreign credit and debit cards for withdrawing cash.

ATM Cash Machines in Tokyo 7 Eleven Stores

ATM Cash Machines in Tokyo 7 Eleven Stores

Recently ‘7 Bank’ have also been installing ATM cash machines in every train station in Tokyo. Usually located close to the main entry and exit points in the train stations and subway stations you will find a ‘7 Bank’ ATM cash machine.

7 Bank ATM Cash machines in Tokyo

7 Bank ATM Cash machines in Tokyo

You can withdraw cash from a 7 Bank ATM cash machine in Tokyo if your credit or debit card has any of these logos – Visa, Mastercard, Maestro, Cirrus, American Express, JCB, UnionPay, Discover or Diners Club.

The Japanese Government has also mandated Japanese bank to enable their ATM cash machines to accept foreign issued cards leading up to the 2020 Summer Olympic games. Mizuho Bank, one of Japan’s largest banks has taken the lead on this initiative by already enabling their ATM cash machines. No when you see a Mizuho bank branch, you can use their ATM cash machines to withdraw cash.

Mizuho Bank ATM Cash machines in Tokyo

Mizuho Bank ATM Cash machines in Tokyo

Also if you see a Citibank branch or Citibank ATM cash machine you can withdraw cash from there.

Enjoy your travels in Tokyo and Japan. Now that it is easier to get cash when you need it!

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Posted in Feature article, Ginza, Japan, Roppongi, Shinjuku, Tokyo

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